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REFLECTIONS

OF

We are a collective of passionate performers that use street dance to tell impactful stories. We are storytellers with a spin, expressing dance as a language and creating unique and exciting pieces that are not only tailored to our client needs, but for the enjoyment of all audiences.
Our diverse dance styles combined will move your SOUL.

MOTION

REFLECTIONS

OF

MOTION

We are a collective of passionate performers that use street dance to tell impactful stories. We are storytellers with a spin, expressing dance as a language and creating unique and exciting pieces that are not only tailored to our client needs, but for the enjoyment of all audiences.
Our diverse dance styles combined will move your SOUL.

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WE TELL

STORIES

THROUGH

DANCE

Our mission is to bring the culture of street dance to the forefront. Every member of our team brings a unique style to the table as professionals that have been fully immersed in the dance scene for years, learning from many of the pioneers and originators. Each individual of our team brings a unique flavour and interpretation of their speciality to each performance.

LEARN MORE
upcoming events
Feb 18

Sunday Coffee Concerts
1260 Riverwood Gate Coquitlam

Apr 27

Urban Alchemy 8
950 West 41st Avenue Vancouver

Apr 28

Big Trouble in Little Vancouver 5
4015 Fraser Street Vancouver

Aug 15

LOCKING KHAN WORKSHOP

Sunday Coffee Concerts

1260 Riverwood Gate Coquitlam

Project Soul is performing "The Routes" their 60 minute interactive street dance show followed by a free workshop!

Urban Alchemy 8

950 West 41st Avenue Vancouver

An evening of Vancouver's finest street dance talent with special guests Bboy Storm and Goku. Hosts: Waackeisha and Kenny Mugisha

Big Trouble in Little Vancouver 5

4015 Fraser Street Vancouver

Big Trouble in Little Vancouver All Styles & Breaking Competition Judges: Bboy Storm, Goku & Abstrak (Breaking) Bboy Storm, Waackeisha, Natasha Gorrie (All Styles) MC: Wicket DJs: Fleg & Static  

LOCKING KHAN WORKSHOP

Locking Khan is back Vancouver! He will be teaching only 1  workshop while he's here on Wed. August 15, 2018  7:30-9:00pm @ the Dance Centre (677 Davie Street). Pre-register & pay to reserve your spot in this amazing workshop send an email and etransfer to vandance.events@gmail.com. $20.00 In Advance w/ Pre-registration & Payment $25.00 Cash at the Door DON'T MISS OUT!

OUR STYLES

Voguing

You Can Thank the Drag Queens
Inspired by the glamorous top models of Vogue Magazine, voguing was created by African-American drag queens during the early 1960s. The style arose from Harlem ballrooms, where dance competitions were often held amongst the LGBTQ community.Sass and attitude are key players in Vogue battles. Drag queens would “throw shade” at each other through the art of dance, with the sassiest queen taking the crown.These exaggerated hand movements became signature of the voguing style.

Locking

From the Funky Chicken to Locking
Locking was originally created by mistake. Invented by a dancer, Don Campbell, in the late 1960s, Campbell had trouble dancing the moves to very popular dances such as  the “funky chicken” and the “robot shuffle”. While he was performing, he would forget the moves by freezing, or “locking”. The audience finding it quite funny,  would laugh, and to brush it off, Campbell would point at the audience and join them in laughter. Those locks and points would later become the signature moves of the locking style. Don and the original Lockers gained recognition when they performed on the hit show “Soul Train”, and the rest is history!

Popping

Hit Those Joints
The origins of poppin aren’t clear, however, historians attribute the popularity and expansion of this style to two particular dancers, Sam Solomon, aka “Boogaloo Sam” and his brother, Timothy Salomon, aka “Popin’ Pete”, who started dancing in Fresno, California in the late 1960s. The dance style consists of a fluid “popping” or “hitting” of the joints and muscles, or in Popin’ Pete’s words: “hittin’ your joints, hittin’ hard with your leg, your neck, your head.”

Breaking

Kung Fu Acrobatics
Breaking pioneers Richard “Crazy legs” Colon and Kenneth “Ken Swift” Gabbert pulled inspiration from singer and dancer James Brown as well as the Kung Fu films to further define this dance style. This explains the acrobatic nature of breaking in dance moves such as the “flare”, in which the performer alternates balancing the torso between either arm while swinging the legs beneath them in continuous circles.

Spoken Word (EMCEE)

Poetry for Performance
Spoken Word is a word-based performance art that focuses on the aesthetics of word play, intonation and voice inflection. Characterized by rhyme, repetition, improvisation, and word play, spoken word frequently refer to issues of social justice, politics, race, and community. Spoken word is made even more impactful when accompanied with dance.

Hip Hop

More Than a Dance, a Movement
Hip Hop can be traced  back to an underground movement that developed in the South Bronx in the 1970s. It was an artistic way of protesting the impact of legal institutions on minorities, particularly police and prisons. Hip Hop includes a wide range of styles influenced by its original form of breakin’ which was created in the 1970s and popularized party dances from the late 80s and early 90s. This dance was made popular by dance crews in the United States, notably Elite Force and the Mop Tops Crews.

House

A Blend of Cultures
Originating from the clubs of Chicago and of New York, House is a community based dance. Its movements stem directly from the music and the elements within the music such as jazz, African, Latin, soul, R&B, funk, hip hop, etc. The main elements of House dance include "Footwork", "Jacking", and "Lofting". House is often improvised and emphasizes fast and complex foot-oriented steps combined with fluid movements in the torso, as well as floor work.

Waacking

Long Live Disco
Starting in the 1970's Gay Club Scene of Los Angeles, this dance is derived from Punking and the first dance group was known as the Original Punks. As Punking spread to the straight dance community (such as Locker - Shabba Doo, and as they began to take part, it took on the name 'Whacking' and eventually became known as Waacking. The typical music choice for Waacking is 1970’s disco, and the originators were said to have danced to underground disco.

Tap

Become the Beat
Tap is a form of dance characterized by using the sounds of tap shoes striking the floor as a form of percussion. Two major variations on tap dance exist: rhythm (jazz) tap and Broadway tap. Broadway tap focuses on dance; it is widely performed in musical theater. Rhythm tap focuses on musicality, and practitioners consider themselves to be a part of the jazz tradition.

Dancehall

Not Just a Genre, But a Culture
Dancehall - named after dance halls that featured sound systems (deejays) - began in the 1940s in Kingston, Jamaica, when people in the inner city were not able to participate in dances uptown. Rather than a genre of music or style of dance, an entire culture emerged around dancehall, giving movers and shakers a community to showcase their creativity and feel the music. Dancehall inspired many of the hip hop and breakdance moves we see in videos today.

Voguing

You Can Thank the Drag Queens
Inspired by the glamorous top models of Vogue Magazine, voguing was created by African-American drag queens during the early 1960s. The style arose from Harlem ballrooms, where dance competitions were often held amongst the LGBTQ community.Sass and attitude are key players in Vogue battles. Drag queens would “throw shade” at each other through the art of dance, with the sassiest queen taking the crown.These exaggerated hand movements became signature of the voguing style.

Locking

From the Funky Chicken to Locking
Locking was originally created by mistake. Invented by a dancer, Don Campbell, in the late 1960s, Campbell had trouble dancing the moves to very popular dances such as  the “funky chicken” and the “robot shuffle”. While he was performing, he would forget the moves by freezing, or “locking”. The audience finding it quite funny,  would laugh, and to brush it off, Campbell would point at the audience and join them in laughter. Those locks and points would later become the signature moves of the locking style. Don and the original Lockers gained recognition when they performed on the hit show “Soul Train”, and the rest is history!

Popping

Hit Those Joints
The origins of poppin aren’t clear, however, historians attribute the popularity and expansion of this style to two particular dancers, Sam Solomon, aka “Boogaloo Sam” and his brother, Timothy Salomon, aka “Popin’ Pete”, who started dancing in Fresno, California in the late 1960s. The dance style consists of a fluid “popping” or “hitting” of the joints and muscles, or in Popin’ Pete’s words: “hittin’ your joints, hittin’ hard with your leg, your neck, your head.”

Breaking

Kung Fu Acrobatics
Breaking pioneers Richard “Crazy legs” Colon and Kenneth “Ken Swift” Gabbert pulled inspiration from singer and dancer James Brown as well as the Kung Fu films to further define this dance style. This explains the acrobatic nature of breaking in dance moves such as the “flare”, in which the performer alternates balancing the torso between either arm while swinging the legs beneath them in continuous circles.

Spoken Word (EMCEE)

Poetry for Performance
Spoken Word is a word-based performance art that focuses on the aesthetics of word play, intonation and voice inflection. Characterized by rhyme, repetition, improvisation, and word play, spoken word frequently refer to issues of social justice, politics, race, and community. Spoken word is made even more impactful when accompanied with dance.

Hip Hop

More Than a Dance, a Movement
Hip Hop can be traced  back to an underground movement that developed in the South Bronx in the 1970s. It was an artistic way of protesting the impact of legal institutions on minorities, particularly police and prisons. Hip Hop includes a wide range of styles influenced by its original form of breakin’ which was created in the 1970s and popularized party dances from the late 80s and early 90s. This dance was made popular by dance crews in the United States, notably Elite Force and the Mop Tops Crews.

House

A Blend of Cultures
Originating from the clubs of Chicago and of New York, House is a community based dance. Its movements stem directly from the music and the elements within the music such as jazz, African, Latin, soul, R&B, funk, hip hop, etc. The main elements of House dance include "Footwork", "Jacking", and "Lofting". House is often improvised and emphasizes fast and complex foot-oriented steps combined with fluid movements in the torso, as well as floor work.

Waacking

Long Live Disco
Starting in the 1970's Gay Club Scene of Los Angeles, this dance is derived from Punking and the first dance group was known as the Original Punks. As Punking spread to the straight dance community (such as Locker - Shabba Doo, and as they began to take part, it took on the name 'Whacking' and eventually became known as Waacking. The typical music choice for Waacking is 1970’s disco, and the originators were said to have danced to underground disco.

Tap

Become the Beat
Tap is a form of dance characterized by using the sounds of tap shoes striking the floor as a form of percussion. Two major variations on tap dance exist: rhythm (jazz) tap and Broadway tap. Broadway tap focuses on dance; it is widely performed in musical theater. Rhythm tap focuses on musicality, and practitioners consider themselves to be a part of the jazz tradition.

Dancehall

Not Just a Genre, But a Culture
Dancehall - named after dance halls that featured sound systems (deejays) - began in the 1940s in Kingston, Jamaica, when people in the inner city were not able to participate in dances uptown. Rather than a genre of music or style of dance, an entire culture emerged around dancehall, giving movers and shakers a community to showcase their creativity and feel the music. Dancehall inspired many of the hip hop and breakdance moves we see in videos today.

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